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Experiencing

Cycle Magic Treks

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Legendary spirit of the Australian high country folk,

Posted on 21 September, 2013 at 16:37 Comments comments (31)
Everything about the Australian Alps is seen in epic mountain ranges, enchanting wildlife, massive lakes, mysterious rivers, and ample opportunity for that big adventure that reveals the legendary spirit of the Australian high country mountain folk, played out on a vast stage yet delivered through intimate, personal encounters and moments.

The Aussie Visitor Experience

Posted on 6 February, 2013 at 16:09 Comments comments (251)
 
The Visitor Experience Proposition
 
More than any other destination, the legendary ‘Man fromSnowy River’ Country is an engaging and personal, Magic experience.   With cyclists looking for more than just scenery or pampered relaxation, and seek a unique and authentic experiences.
 
Victoria’s Murray River High Country will consistently deliver memorable experiences that,
 
Touch your senses,
 
Take you off the beaten track,
 
Meet the Local highcountry folk and experience the Aussie culture and be able to actively learnabout their heritage,
 
Learn about DifferentLandscapes and wildlife,
 
This legendary “Man from Snowy River” country offers the key experience that differentiates us from any other destination in Australia.
 
Visitors can expect to experience:-
 
-      Australiana
 
-     Aboriginal History,Heritage and art.
 
-     Nature
 
-     Legends
 
-     Food and wine
 
-     Journeys
 
Our journeys are more than just getting from one place to another: they’re about discovering the diversity, the wonders, the vibrant towns, the people and their unique way of life.
 
The Experience Seeker can enjoy the vast mountain range, the sky, the stars, the pubs; the cattle stations and meet the people that make this uniquely Australian landscape what it is. Encounter and learn about distinctive flora and fauna found nowhere else in the world.Visiting quaint villages, and dine in stunning restaurants and cafes or simply eat al fresco sampling local food and wine produce.
 

Wilderness Cycling

Posted on 30 January, 2013 at 19:24 Comments comments (15)
The Jagungal Wilderness
The Jagungal Wilderness is one of the most picturesque areas in The Kosciusko National Park. It is the area stretching from Mt Jagungal south to Guthega Power Station and offers great views towards the Main Range. The best way to appreciate the true beauty of the Snowy Mountains is to get off the beaten track and explore The Jagungal Wilderness.
We chose to begin our ride at Round Mountain which is near Mt Selwyn ski fields. From here we headed towards Derschkos Hut where we stopped for lunch. Derschkos Hut was once used by Park Rangers and is one of the most pristine huts in the region. The potbelly stove would be a welcome sight to many cross-country skiers but not to us, after cycling in 30+ degree heat. We decided to spend the night under the stars, preferring the mice free environment of our tents.
The next day we climbed Mt Jagungal where we got a great view towards the main range and further south in to the Jagungal Wilderness. The northern side of the main range is much more spectacular than the other sides with a steep wall down to the Geehi River. It was here that we saw the last person until Guthega Power Station as we left the track and headed into the beckoning wilderness. The soaring temperature and the lack of shade made this day difficult. Once we reached our destination for the day, Mawson’s Hut, we set up camp and luxuriated.
Mawson’s hut is an old tin hut but is one of the most interesting of all huts. Inside is a small library where one can read some of the many books written on the area. From the hut a distant Mt Jagungal can be seen through the few trees.
That night a pleasant change came, and this led to much nicer cycling conditions for the next day which required us crossing the Kerries range. The sometimes 360 degree views from the range is a must for all cyclists  visiting the area. At the end of the range lies Gungartan, a mountain that is slightly higher than Mt Jagungal. We decided to climb it as we had plenty of time and the climb looked very easy. At the top of Gungartan a strong wind blew from the north, this wind was so strong that you could lean right in to it. After descending Gungartan we climed onto the saddles and headed down a gully that would take us to Schlink Hilton Hut. From there we zig-zagged down the gully. After negotiating this gully we arrived at Schlink Hilton Hut where we had a quick stop and headed on to White’s River Hut for the last night of our trek. Once in our tents we heard a distant rumbling, so it was out of the tents for a guy rope test. The storm battered us with wind, hail, lightning and lots of rain.
The next day was an easy ride down a fire trail to Guthega Power Station.
 

Safe Breaking

Posted on 30 January, 2013 at 19:15 Comments comments (25)
How to... brake safely on your bike?
 
Breaking is what happens when you don't brake properly when riding a bike!
And if anyone should know this it's our fearless leader Geoff Gabites. When he first set up Adventure South over 20 years ago he went over the handle bars and broke his shoulder in 5 places.
So, if a little advice on applying your brakes on a bike can help the founder of a company that specialises in cycling holidays we hope that it can also help you.
Make sure you stay ahead of the crowd at the Emergency room! Watch this video to learn even more about on one of the most basics and important aspects of cycling.
 

High Country Rail Trail

Posted on 30 January, 2013 at 19:10 Comments comments (22)
High Country Rail Trail
 
 
January 20, 2013 by dmccrohan
A couple of weeks ago my wife and I rode departed Wodonga late afternoon and rode out to Tallangatta and stayed the night before returning the next morning. Very enjoyable missing the heat of the day and heaps of colourful birds all the way out in the evening. Huon to Tallangatta is great especially riding across the bridge with the water level up so high. Tallangatta Motel was good value for money. Tallangatta Hotel didn't leave the same feeling but bakery was better in the morning.
 

Opening of the High Country Rail Trail

Posted on 21 January, 2013 at 0:23 Comments comments (26)
The long awaited Opening of the High Country Rail Trail
Monday, 22 October 2012
 
 
The long awaited opening of the High Country Rail Trail in Victoria has finally arrived with the completion of the Sandy Creek bridge. Started in 2006, completion of the trail was significantly delayed as the bridge construction was planned on the basis of the Hume being dry, but with recent rains this plan needed to change. Ground breaking construction methods were needed, including floating the bridge into place, to accommodate the new water filled Hume.
 
 
Riders can now complete the 40km trail along undulating gravel starting at Wodonga and finishing at Old Tallangatta. More info about this rail trail can be found on the Rail Trails Australia website
 
 
Cycle Magic Treks is now able to complete the whole excursion along the rail trail from old Tallangatta along this new rail trail through pine forests and farmland to its rail end at Cudgewa townscape and onto Corryong town along the extended cycle trail.
 
 
 
 
Victorian Hume Region Significant Tracks and Trails Strategy Survey
30 November 2012
Twelve local government authorities in Victoria's Hume region, along with Hume Regional Development Australia and the Victorian Government are in the process of developing a strategy to further develop existing and potential significant walking, cycling, mountain bike riding and horse riding tracks and trails in the region. In order to improve the network of tracks and trails in the region, they want to understand the needs and interests of existing and potential track and trail users so that they can plan accordingly.
We encourage you to participate in the survey.
Surveys need to be completed by 7 December 2012.

Forgotten Gold and Aboriginal Trails

Posted on 13 November, 2012 at 17:44 Comments comments (128)
Forgotten Gold and Aboriginal Trails
 
I like to take a leisurely three or four day bike trek through the mountains of the Murray river high country.
Some years back, while browsing through the “Man from Snowy River” Museum in Corryong, I stumbled upon an old map dated back to the late 1890s where I   discovered a couple of old tracks not shown on any current map publications. One was an old gold mining and cattlemen track and the other a track of sorts which follows the gradient of the old blacks track before European settlement.
 
I engaged a local Guide who knew of these tracks to outfit a Mountain Bike trek in the Snowy Mountains to explore these ancient trails.
To venture along these tracks is to enter into a forest wonderland.
All along its course, the cyclist is afforded fantastic views of both the mountains and rivers; in fact the tracks pass through some of the most spectacular country that this portion of Victoria, on the western slopes of the Snowy Mountains, has to   offer. It winds over high gaps, negotiates its way around precipitous bluffs, passes through tall timber and skirts above spectacular river gorges.
 
This journey, through dry and typically hard and tough Australian bush, is alternately punctuated by the adventurer being led down into cool fern gullies, the home of crystal streams whose banks are carpeted with hazel, blanket wood, musk, maiden hair and ancient tree fern. Some of the later “citizens” of the lush under story have obtained tremendous heights.
Being greeted by Kangaroo, Wallaby, Emus and Lyrebird was an unexpected delight to this adventurous traveller, and is truly a trek through the “forest primeval”. 
These remote trails are now accessible with the aid of a guide and can be arranged through Cycle Magic Treks adventure tours by contacting them on Phone No. (02) 6076 1832. Or email [email protected]
 

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